Monday, September 30th, 2019

Mathematics Alumni Career Panel at noon on Thursday 10/3 in Olin 268

Hear advice and perspectives from Bucknell alumni who will examine career paths that utilize the mathematics degree while discussing their work and available opportunities. The conversation will include a question and answer period and an opportunity to meet (and network with!) the alumni panelists. Pizza and calzones will be provided. This event is sponsored by the Mathematics Department and the Center for Career Advancement. Panelists: Allison Gibson ‘13, Consultant, Boston Consulting Group; MBA Graduate 2019, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University Rachel Guen ‘19, Associate Analyst, Moody’s Investors Service Zach Moon, ASA ‘16, Actuarial Advisor, Cigna Jin On ’12, Manager, […]

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Friday, September 13th, 2019

“Understanding Statistical Significance” at noon on Thursday 9/19 in Olin 268

Student Colloquium talk by Professor Kari Lock Morgan, Penn State University Title: Understanding Statistical Significance Abstract:  You may or may not have heard of results being “statistically significant,” and you may or may not know that results qualify as statistically significant if the p-value falls below a given threshold.  Regardless of whether these phrases currently hold any meaning for you, the goal of this talk will be to shed light on the actual meaning of a p-value and statistical significance (beyond just “p < 0.05”).  This will be accomplished by covering a modern and computationally intensive way of computing a p-value […]

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Monday, September 2nd, 2019

“Interacting with the Shadow of Data” at noon on Thursday 9/5 in Olin 268

Student Colloquium talk by Professor J.T. Fry, Bucknell University Title: Interacting with the Shadow of Data Abstract:  In our first statistics class, we learn how to build a scatterplot to visualize two variables at once. But what happens when we have many variables? Projection methods such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) can create 2D pictures of higher-dimensional data, much like how the sun projects our 3D body into a 2D shadow. However, exploring these high-dimensional datasets can be complicated. In this talk, we present a visual analytics model that allows the user to combine their personal knowledge with a projection method to find novel […]

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Monday, April 22nd, 2019

“Problems and Pipelines: A story from the frontline of data science” at noon on Thursday 4/25 in Olin 268

  Student Colloquium talk by Professor Patrick McDonald, New College of Florida Title: Problems and Pipelines: A story from the frontline of data science Abstract: Suppose you were to suddenly obtain access to a remarkably rich data source, say, a trove of health records. What would you do? In this talk I will sketch how a group at New College handled such a situation. In so doing I will provide you with a glimpse of what it is like to work on a large-scale data science project, paying special attention to the vast array of required skill sets, social constraints and behavior […]

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Monday, April 8th, 2019

“The Dynamics of Continued Fractions” at noon on Thursday 4/11 in Olin 268

Student Colloquium talk by Professor Daniel Visscher, Ithaca College Title: The Dynamics of Continued Fractions Abstract: While only rational numbers have a fraction representation, all real numbers have a continued fraction representation. Continued fractions illuminate interesting structure in real numbers, for example, by giving a way to express how close a real number is to being rational. In this talk, we investigate continued fractions from the point of view of a dynamicist, framing the topic in terms of iterating a function and asking questions about how orbits distribute. Multiple flavors of π will be present, and the golden ratio will make approximately 1.618 appearances.

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Sunday, March 24th, 2019

“When is the best time to stop?” at noon on Monday 3/25 in Olin 268

Student Colloquium talk by Professor Ryan Hynd, University of Pennsylvania Title: When is the best time to stop? Abstract:Suppose that you are observing a sequence of events, and need to decide when to stop. Your goal could be to maximize an expected gain or give yourself a good chance to make the best choice possible.  We will discuss several instances of this type of problem and talk about ways to use math to solve them.

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Monday, March 18th, 2019

“Mathematics of Outbreaks: Exploring Infectious Disease Transmission and Control with Mathematical Models” at noon on Thursday 3/21 in Olin 268

Student Colloquium talk by Professor Michael A. Robert, University of the Sciences Title: Mathematics of Outbreaks: Exploring Infectious Disease Transmission and Control with Mathematical Models Abstract: Mathematical models have long been used to study the spread of infectious diseases. From smallpox to influenza to Zika virus, mathematical models help us understand how infectious diseases spread and how we can potentially control their spread. Models are also powerful tools for making predictions about how infectious diseases may emerge and spread in the future. In this talk, I will introduce mathematical models developed to study infectious diseases, and I will discuss my recent work […]

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Wednesday, March 6th, 2019

46th John Steiner Gold Mathematical Competition on March 13, 2019

On March 13, Bucknell will host the 46th Professor John Steiner Gold Mathematical Competition. The competition is open to all area high schools, public and private. Each school may enter up to three students, who will compete for both team and individual prizes. Please see the link below for more details about this year’s competition. Best of luck to all participants! John Steiner Gold Exam Announcement  

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